Le Vieux Pin Petit Blanc Sigma.

(James Romanow/The Saskatoon StarPhoenix)

The answer of course is to make a blend. Call me cynical but when I see idiosyncratic blends on the shelf I assume the vintner is making a two-handed grab for a better profit margin.

Such blends very seldom stay static, because the vintner is dependent on what’s available at the appropriate price. This is something of a problem for the consumer because unless you really just love the backstory the wine will change from year to year.

Okanagan winemakers have been playing around with Marsanne, Roussanne and Viognier for almost 20 years. All of these grapes have their fans but I haven’t heard of a label having massive success with any of them from BC. I’m not sure whether this is due to consumer intransigence or some perhaps less than stellar yeast choices. These three are the backbone of some really expensive wines from the Rhone.

Regardless I picked up another blend from Le Vieux Pin the other day, their Petit Blanc “Sigma” wine. It’s got pretty much everything in it but the kitchen sink – Sauvignon blanc, Pinot Blanc, and the above three grapes. The bouquet is fabulously fruity, peach and apricot mostly, with some flowers. The palate is reasonably brisk although the wine is weightier than most whites.

The finish however depends on the temperature. If you serve this wine at fridge temp, the finish is quite bitter. At room temperature the bitterness is much less apparent. This is a great wine for fondues, and smoked cheeses, but I’d be careful to serve it at 10 degrees or warmer.

Le Vieux Pin Petit Blanc Sigma $19 ****

Autumnal red next week. Other wines on Twitter @drbooze.